Night Film by Marisha Pessl

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… Because every one of us has four box, a dark chamber stowing the thing that lanced our heart. It contains what you do everything for, strive for, would everything around you. And if it were opened, would anything be set free? No. For the impenetrable prison with the impossible lock is you own head.

The decision to read Night Film came as a whim while I was scrolling through my list in my e-reader. One chapter in an I have convinced myself I can only read this during daytime.

On a damp October night, 24-year-old Ashley Cordova is found dead in an abandoned warehouse in lower Manhattan. Though her death is ruled a suicide, veteran investigative journalist Scott McGrath suspects otherwise. As he probes the strange circumstances surrounding Ashley’s life and death, McGrath comes face-to-face with the legacy of her father: the legendary, reclusive cult-horror film director Stanislaus Cordova–a man who hasn’t been seen in public for more than thirty years.

For McGrath, another death connected to this seemingly cursed family dynasty seems more than just a coincidence. Though much has been written about Cordova’s dark and unsettling films, very little is known about the man himself.

Driven by revenge, curiosity, and a need for the truth, McGrath, with the aid of two strangers, is drawn deeper and deeper into Cordova’s eerie, hypnotic world. The last time he got close to exposing the director, McGrath lost his marriage and his career. This time he might lose even more. (Goodreads)

Ashley Cordova’s death sent McGrath into an investigation frenzy. He believes there’s more to Ashley’s alleged suicide and he wanted to get to the bottom of it. He wanted to know the truth.

This is my first Pessl novel and I didn’t expect to enjoy it, but I did. I get scared easily so reading this at 3 in the morning while I nurse my daughter was not (I guess I should say never) an option. I think the main reason I was fearful throughout this reading experience was I went in to Night Film blind. I thought, based on the cover, it’ll be about films shown at night, and their audience. I was SO wrong. However, I powered through it and as much as it frightened me, I kept pressing for the next page.

I was not too thrilled of how it dragged on. I was constantly wondering if I was getting close to the end, closer to the truth. Ultimately though, I felt the novel was a buildup to an ok ending. It didn’t give me that feeling of contempt, and relief I was hoping for. If anything, I’m left confused between versions of truths presented to me on the days I read Night Film.

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Gangsta Granny by David Walliams

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I have mentioned in the beginning of the year that my main reading goal this year is to be able to read. Here I am telling you I will be extending that to listening to audiobooks as well. I am aware of the debate of whether or not listening to audiobooks counts as reading a book but in my opinion, it does. We’re consuming the same text. It’s the medium of consumption that’s different.

Gangsta Granny by David Walliams is my first audiobook of 2018. I chose a short children’s book because I found out it’s the easiest way to ease myself in to listening to audiobooks.

Gangsta Granny is about Ben who finds spending time with his grandmother boring. They do the same thing every week, and he gets served mostly the same food every week he visits. However, what he doesn’t know is his grandmother has a secret: she’s was once an international jewel thief.

I mostly listened to this while I was doing laundry. I do about 2-3 loads, so I figured a children’s audiobook roughly 3 hours long would be easy for a 30-year-old to follow while doing chores. I am so glad I found this while I was browsing our library’s audiobook catalogue. It was witty, funny, and entertaining. Also, listening to David Walliams narrate was a nice touch.

I cannot recommend this enough. If you’re looking for an audiobook to start your audiobook endeavours, I don’t think you can ever go wrong starting with children’s books.

 

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Getting Reacquainted With Narnia: The Magician’s Nephew by C. S. Lewis

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The whole adventure begins when Digory and Polly find themselves in eccentric Uncle Andrew’s secret study. But when Uncle Andrew tricks Polly into touching the magic ring, she vanishes into the Other World. Digory is aghast, and determines immediately to go in search of her, Not only does he find Polly but together they listened to Aslan’s song as he creates the enchanted world of Narnia, full of sun, trees, flowers, grass and animals.

My first finished book for 2018.

I’m not new to the land of Narnia but all I know of it was from watching The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. It was quite interesting learning about how Narnia came to be, and the origin of the wardrobe itself.

My husband bought me the entire series for Christmas so I have a lot of C. S. Lewis ahead of me.

The Magician’s Nephew pretty much revolved around Digory who, in this story, is the magician’s nephew. This is also the first time we ever see of the evil witch, and Aslan.

It was through Digory’s uncle (and his persistence) that he and his friend Polly was able to witness, albeit accidentally, the birth of Narnia. This is one of my favorite parts of the book because of how Lewis illustrated Narnia’s beginning through words. Something came from nothing and that is mesmerizing to me.

Another thing I enjoyed about this book is the test of character Digory had to go through. Given a task and knowing certain aspects of it could help his mother get better, he went ahead and only did what he was supposed to do. He almost deviated and I was rooting for him to stay focused.

It was a great way to get reacquainted again with Narnia after a few years. A few adaptations have been released from this series and I’m looking forward to watching those again after reading the series to see the differences between them.

 

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